Reimagining education in a remote world

While the corporate world has shifted to flexible work environments, the world of academia was forced to pivot to remote education, seemingly overnight.  From three different continents, scholastic leaders explain how they took their brick and mortar schools to a synchronous, virtual model. 

VIDEO | 30m
June 8, 2020

Executive summary

  • Learn how institutions are blending education and recreating the higher learning experience, all online.
  • Hear how they are keeping faculty and students engaged, discuss online exam options, plans for the future and even touch on the upcoming Quidditch season. 

Featured voices

Tim Minahan is EVP of Business Strategy and CMO at Citrix

Steve Hoensch is Head of Frontline Services at the University of Cambridge

Jordan Catling is Associate Director of Client Technology at the University of Sydney

Dr. Scott Ralls is Present at Wake Tech Community College

Tim Minahan
00:10 - 00:22
Well, hello and welcome to the latest episode of Roadworks Citrix Virtual Series, two minute hand, the Executive Vice President of Business Strategy and the Chief Marketing Officer here at Citrix Systems.

Tim Minahan
00:22 - 00:35
And I'll be your host and moderator for this timely discussion on higher education response to
the early 19 pandemic and what it means to the future of collegiate level learning, and the role technology will play in enabling it.

Tim Minahan
00:36 - 00:43
Now as with every industry educators around the globe face both immediate and longer term
crisis management challenges.

Tim Minahan
00:43 - 00:53
Earlier this year, universities everywhere had to respond rapidly to get staff and students home safely and to transition to a remote learning environment nearly overnight.

Tim Minahan
00:54 - 01:02
As most colleges settle into summer break, the work of administrators, faculty, and IT is
anything but complete.

Tim Minahan
01:02 - 01:16
In fact, most are working overtime to determine, not just how to safely return to classes in the
fall, but also to rethink the structure, the role, and balance of classroom and online education
going forward.

Tim Minahan
01:16 - 01:31
Now, to tackle these questions and to share firsthand experience on how to maintain business continuity in the face of an unplanned pandemic, we've assembled a diverse panel of IT leaders from colleges and universities, from all corners of the globe.

Tim Minahan
01:31 - 01:33
I'd like to welcome our panels now.

Tim Minahan
01:34 - 01:40
Welcome Steve, Head of Frontline Services from the University of Cambridge in England.

Tim Minahan
01:40 - 01:41
Welcome, Steve.

Steve Hoensch
01:41 - 01:42
Thank you very much, Great to be here.

Tim Minahan
01:44 - 01:44
Glad to have you.

Tim Minahan
01:45 - 01:51
Next up is doctor Scott Rawls, President of Weak Tech Community College here in the US
Welcome Scott.

Scott Ralls
01:52 - 01:53
Bagatelle, thanks for having me.

Tim Minahan
01:54 - 02:04
Now our final panelist hails from the land down under please welcome Jordan Catlin, Associate
Director of Client Technology from the University of Sydney, Jordan.

Jordan Catling - USyd
02:06 - 02:06
Thanks, Tim.

Jordan Catling - USyd
02:06 - 02:07
Thanks for inviting me.

Tim Minahan
02:09 - 02:15
Jordan, you know, based in Asia, Sydney was among the first universities that was impacted by
the Coronavirus crisis.

Tim Minahan
02:15 - 02:37
So, we'll start with you, can you give us all, just a bit of background on the scale and the scope of the University of Sydney's operations And paint a picture for us of how quickly you prepared for the crisis to enable both your faculty and your student body to continue learning across Asia, both remotely and safely.

Jordan Catling - USyd
02:38 - 02:46
So we're quite a large university, and stuff, and students operate over 22 campuses.

Jordan Catling - USyd
02:47 - 02:57
That's one of the things I love thinking about, love working, love about working at the University of Sydney, is that we work across such a large footprint.

Jordan Catling - USyd
02:58 - 03:10
Of course, when you think of the university, the quadrangle is probably what springs to mind,
but we conduct our teaching and research on working farms in teaching hospitals, and even a
field station on the Great Barrier Reef.

Jordan Catling - USyd
03:12 - 03:30
What this really necessitated for us is in terms of business continuity was to really work out quite rapidly how we're going to keep providing the toolset that we provide to our staff and students that were unable to join us at the start of our semester one at the beginning of this year.

Jordan Catling - USyd
03:30 - 03:40
Um, we think very carefully about the tools that we provide for our staff and students, but at the same time, we're not very prescriptive about how they used.

Jordan Catling - USyd
03:41 - 03:43
Because we work across so many disciplines.

Jordan Catling - USyd
03:45 - 03:59
The reality is, for us that providing the right software to the right people, you know, quickly and when they need it, is, is one of the most important services that we provide.

Jordan Catling - USyd
04:01 - 04:08
We were really on the front foot surprisingly at the beginning of, of this.

Jordan Catling - USyd
04:08 - 04:10
We started thinking about this in late January.

Jordan Catling - USyd
04:10 - 04:24
And we quickly worked through quite a number of solutions to make sure that our staff and
students were able to continue working and providing the high quality education that we're
known for.

Tim Minahan
04:26 - 04:27
Well, fantastic.

Tim Minahan
04:27 - 04:36
You reacted incredibly quickly considering the scale and distribution of your students across
across Asia as well as your faculty.

Tim Minahan
04:36 - 04:47
Now, switching gears a little bit, you know, Steve Cambridge is certainly one of the oldest and
most venerable universities in the world steeped in tradition and traditional classroom teaching methods.

Tim Minahan
04:47 - 04:52
So change doesn't come quickly but the speed of response was critical in the face of this
pandemic.

Tim Minahan
04:52 - 04:58
And I know you had a large number of faculty shift from the classroom to working from home
just in a matter of days.

Tim Minahan
04:58 - 05:02
Tell us a bit about how you made that possible, What the experience has been like.

Steve Hoensch
05:03 - 05:04
Yes.

Steve Hoensch
05:04 - 05:20
So we were quite fortunate, and the way We handle it, because, at the beginning, we'd already been engaged with Citrix for a few months, and we had a working POC with Citrix for probably around six months, where we were trying different things, including the new Workspace app.

Steve Hoensch
05:20 - 05:27
And we were quite far down the process of looking at backend infrastructure, so hyper
converged infrastructure.

Steve Hoensch
05:28 - 05:41
And we were about to launch a new Citrix Service for the University of Cambridge looking at
the admin style function to deliver people in finance.

Steve Hoensch
05:41 - 05:53
So if we have an old schools, and we have people, an Estate management, those type of things, and this would have been a service to deliver the backbone of the University, the Admin function, that was needed to continue.

Steve Hoensch
05:53 - 05:58
So we actually turn that into sort of, a higher gear with Citrix Professional Services.

Steve Hoensch
05:58 - 06:08
And we're able to deliver a way for people to work remotely from home almost on day one of the university going into locked down.

Steve Hoensch
06:08 - 06:10
And that was the decision for us.

Steve Hoensch
06:11 - 06:19
To look at the Admin side of things first, before the student side of things, The admin side for us is a much more controlled environment that we could quickly switch on.

Steve Hoensch
06:19 - 06:22
And basically tell people this is what you need to use.

Steve Hoensch
06:22 - 06:30
And we're now investigating how we could use Citrix to scale that, to looking at our student
body and how that would work in the future.

Steve Hoensch
06:30 - 06:40
Obviously, we're looking at students potentially coming back in October, but that could be
stretched because we're an international university.

Steve Hoensch
06:40 - 06:43
So most of our students come from all around the world.

Steve Hoensch
06:43 - 06:48
So, it's, Well, they are even be able to travel in October, and come back.

Steve Hoensch
06:48 - 07:01
And like you said, we've got the traditional classroom style, teaching, and learning environment, so how we can suddenly flex and move that into an online learning, is something we're looking at all the tools around, at the moment in the market.

Steve Hoensch
07:02 - 07:02
Yeah.

Tim Minahan
07:02 - 07:07
Lots and lots of decisions to be made, And lots of opportunities ahead, and we're gonna, We're gonna get to that in.

Steve Hoensch
07:07 - 07:07
Just.

Tim Minahan
07:07 - 07:08
A moment.

Tim Minahan
07:08 - 07:14
But, Sky, I wanted to turn to you, you know, rated one of the top community colleges in the US.

Tim Minahan
07:14 - 07:24
Week, Tech has a very diverse, and, let's say, non traditional student body, with, many students
also working full-time, and some, even only on the poverty line.

Tim Minahan
07:24 - 07:31
Yet, You were able to quickly enable more than 21,000 students to continue education remotely in just a matter of days.

Tim Minahan
07:31 - 07:45
In part, because you plan ahead, so, tell us a bit about how the IT team at Week tap had prepared for your faculty and your student body to transition to an online learning environment so seamlessly.

Tim Minahan
07:45 - 07:46
Well.

Scott Ralls
07:47 - 07:52
I think, I think for us, that planning began years ago, even though we did not know at that time, we were planning for a pandemic.

Scott Ralls
07:52 - 08:03
Obviously, I think community colleges in the United States have been forerunners in distance
education primarily because of necessity, and that's what happened at Wake Tech 20 years ago.

Scott Ralls
08:03 - 08:14
We we became engaged pretty deeply in distance education to where a majority of our students
participated in some form of online education about six years ago.

Scott Ralls
08:14 - 08:27
Wake Tech went to what I would call, a two phase, And that was really not just about providing Distance Ed, but it was about how to really look at the quality, which began with training, both for our instructors, all our professors, and our students.

Scott Ralls
08:27 - 08:40
So, when we did flip that switch, approximately 90% of our faculty, who are teaching, at that
point in time, and about 75% of our students, had been through at least the initial aspects of our online education training.

Scott Ralls
08:40 - 08:43
And so, that, I think, made a big difference.

Scott Ralls
08:43 - 08:52
Our technology team had been planning for years to increase our resiliency and redundancy, and even we had been a leader in North in the United States looking at issues.

Scott Ralls
08:52 - 08:59
As you mentioned, we, we serve as community colleges, greater percentage of lower income
students and other forms of colleges.

Scott Ralls
08:59 - 09:11
So we had been working in a particular effort to try to erase equity gaps that we saw that occur with online education and so things such as gamification and synchronous learning.

Scott Ralls
09:11 - 09:14
And so that was something that had been in the hopper for us.

Scott Ralls
09:14 - 09:17
And that may be honest with you, the world at different.

Scott Ralls
09:17 - 09:28
So our planning for the pandemic began a month that we did have a pandemic plan but we were able to switch and I don't want to give the idea that was easy.

Scott Ralls
09:28 - 09:29
It was just flipping a switch.

Scott Ralls
09:29 - 09:30
There were huge challenges.

Scott Ralls
09:30 - 09:38
But that preparation that started years ago allowed us, I think, to make that transition easier than some others.

Steve Hoensch
09:39 - 09:39
And I.

Tim Minahan
09:39 - 09:41
Think that's such a very important point.

Tim Minahan
09:41 - 09:50
We spend a lot of time talking about the, the, how, the technology, the operations, the protocols, but, but but there is an actual skill, a different skill to online learning.

Tim Minahan
09:50 - 09:57
And then in the classroom, and, you know, and so much of the quality of the engagement
changes.

Tim Minahan
09:57 - 10:06
And so it's great to hear that you had training people, both faculty and even students, are already familiar with, with that type of learning environment.

Tim Minahan
10:09 - 10:16
So, Jordan, let's switch back to you, know, believe it or not, there's a lot of talk now about
opening up economies.

Tim Minahan
10:16 - 10:21
And going back, go back to the office, back to the university planning for the fall.

Tim Minahan
10:21 - 10:27
So Asian economies were were among the first to roll back to some semblance of normalcy.

Tim Minahan
10:27 - 10:29
Opening businesses.

Tim Minahan
10:29 - 10:39
Sending people back to the office, but has re-opening change, the universities education
approach, and what are your plans to kind of re-open the physical classroom safely there and
Sydney?

Jordan Catling - USyd
10:41 - 10:41
Sure.

Jordan Catling - USyd
10:41 - 10:48
So we have a two semester year at the University of Sydney, we're approaching the end of
semester one.

Jordan Catling - USyd
10:49 - 10:52
But we're obviously planning very carefully about semester two.

Tim Minahan
10:54 - 10:54
In.

Jordan Catling - USyd
10:54 - 11:05
Terms of re-opening the country really, Australia has only really started to begin that at the
moment very carefully with the with the three Stage Plan.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:06 - 11:11
We're only just starting to see businesses like restaurants and that sort of thing start to take
customers.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:11 - 11:18
So it has been quite a slow start to re-opening re-opening the country.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:18 - 11:18
Really.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:18 - 11:24
But you know, the, the on campus experience is one that's really important to us.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:25 - 11:43
Um, but this situation has given us a little bit of pause for thought around what were the kinds of activities that were doing previously that could be served more flexibly, with a mixture of online and offline offline modes.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:44 - 11:52
There are some things that really, you know, at this point in time, with the technology available to us, aren't able to be taught remotely.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:52 - 11:58
So, you know, we're really keen to resume those kinds of activities on campus.

Jordan Catling - USyd
11:59 - 12:05
But I think we'll do it with perhaps more of a blend of online tools and then what we previously would have used.

Tim Minahan
12:08 - 12:22
Yeah, we're all certainly, you know, certainly, you know, adapter, but there are some, if you will, the positives that folks are learning and how to how to embrace this new, remote model And how to apply a long term for that topic.

Tim Minahan
12:22 - 12:34
Steve, I'll switch back to, you know, we see pictures around the world, now, with the waters and the canals in Venice running clear skylines from LA, to Bombay free of smog for the first time in ages many organizations.

Tim Minahan
12:34 - 12:43
Whether it's businesses, whether it's universities are really waking up to the environmental
benefits of this more distance learning.

Tim Minahan
12:43 - 12:44
It's more working.

Tim Minahan
12:46 - 13:01
So prior to the pandemic though, the University of Cambridge was already looking into remote solutions to reduce its carbon footprint, tell us a bit more about the university's original ecofriendly goals and perhaps how it's evolved in the face of recent events.

Steve Hoensch
13:02 - 13:19
Yeah, so, so the Cambridge University was looking at sort of a carbon neutral plan by 2030, And to do that, this is one of the reasons we were looking at sort of remote learning, but also looking at stopping people from coming, needing to drive into site.

Steve Hoensch
13:19 - 13:22
So Cambridge is about an hour away from London.

Steve Hoensch
13:22 - 13:26
So we have a lot of people that work down in London that can meet up every day.

Steve Hoensch
13:27 - 13:40
And we have a lot of people that work in small villages that have to drive, and so Cambridge
traffic is, you, know, nowhere near as bad as LA or anything like that, but it's, it's, it's quite bad,
you know, to take, to get our to do sort of 10 miles.

Steve Hoensch
13:40 - 13:44
And so, it was looking at ways we could reduce people needing to come into the office.

Steve Hoensch
13:45 - 13:52
And I think if there's any silver lining behind what's happened with this pandemic is, you know,
we've because we've had to flex in a different way.

Steve Hoensch
13:52 - 14:00
It's actually shown that people can now work remotely, and I think some of the buildings that
were fully occupied, I don't think we'll go back in the same way.

Steve Hoensch
14:00 - 14:11
I think we will have a complete, you know, a lot of people working remotely from home going
forward, which will have a huge impact on the green agenda and the buildings that we're putting up around Cambridge.

Steve Hoensch
14:13 - 14:17
But also, we were looking at lowering the cost of the endpoint.

Steve Hoensch
14:17 - 14:23
So, not only in the amount of power it draws, but also in its, you know, in the cost.

Steve Hoensch
14:23 - 14:29
So we were traditionally purchasing desktops for people.

Steve Hoensch
14:29 - 14:36
So, you know, now, we're looking at, we, you know, we saw a switch sort of, over the last couple of years, where we were buying 40% laptops.

Steve Hoensch
14:37 - 14:46
And 60% desktops, where now we were about to start looking at thin terminals using Citrix to
deploy a much smaller sort.

Steve Hoensch
14:48 - 14:52
Of power footprint, but also a cost footprint for people.

Steve Hoensch
14:53 - 15:01
And one of the interesting developments that we were working with Citrix and a company called a trusting partnership, was to get the Raspberry Pi.

Steve Hoensch
15:01 - 15:19
So the Raspberry Pi for as a small under £100 desktop, that could be delivered to people,
basically, at home or in the workplace to do basic work style functions, you know, accessing
Office, the Microsoft teams, the general tools that people would need.

Steve Hoensch
15:19 - 15:22
And that was quite an interesting project that we were looking at.

Steve Hoensch
15:22 - 15:31
But, you know, the reduction of somebody using a 400 watt PC down to 12, what Raspberry Pi is quite an interesting fail to look into.

Steve Hoensch
15:32 - 15:39
So we're still investigating that now, and we're wondering what we can do to enable that with
Citrix working at home.

Steve Hoensch
15:40 - 15:40
So.

Tim Minahan
15:41 - 15:53
Right, for those of you listening in in the US, when he said £100, he meant monetarily not
always the client.

Tim Minahan
15:53 - 15:54
But this is great.

Tim Minahan
15:54 - 16:01
I mean, a great example of how your IT organization, there, is really going to help drive the
sustainability initiatives of the university.

Tim Minahan
16:03 - 16:06
Scott, let's, let's, let's switch back to you know.

Tim Minahan
16:07 - 16:09
Jordan brought this up earlier.

Tim Minahan
16:09 - 16:12
Not all teaching can effectively be recreated online.

Tim Minahan
16:12 - 16:19
In fact, you know, week tech has a significant number of students in trade schools that need more hands-on training.

Tim Minahan
16:19 - 16:26
So, how are you managing to keep those youth learning, and how are you preparing for their
continued dedication come this fall?

Scott Ralls
16:26 - 16:29
I think that is a unique challenge and opportunity for us.

Scott Ralls
16:29 - 16:34
We're unique in that regard, because we, we play this kinda core workforce development
elements.

Scott Ralls
16:34 - 16:41
So we have one campus that's dedicated to public safety, where biggest law enforcement training for the area.

Scott Ralls
16:41 - 16:42
We have one campuses.

Scott Ralls
16:42 - 16:42
Healthcare.

Scott Ralls
16:42 - 16:48
And so we have today, you know, students during welding programs and in nursing programs
who we are.

Scott Ralls
16:48 - 16:50
And so we're working with.

Scott Ralls
16:50 - 16:55
And so we're going through your protocols in terms of social distancing, health checks,
temperature screening.

Scott Ralls
16:56 - 16:58
All of those kinds of elements as we graduate in.

Scott Ralls
16:58 - 17:04
So, you know, for us, the move to fully online was a drastic kind of quick thing.

Scott Ralls
17:04 - 17:09
The ramp backup is an incremental, and so first is dealt with those.

Scott Ralls
17:10 - 17:15
Those positions that have already been identified here in North Carolina as essential.

Scott Ralls
17:15 - 17:27
But I've been very proud of, and very, just Marvel, that was the innovation of our faculty in those
programs, to think in that regard, are good examples, are baking and pastry program.

Scott Ralls
17:27 - 17:31
So it was, you know, a quick turnaround for us and what they did.

Scott Ralls
17:31 - 17:36
They have a huge pantry and they pulled out everything in the pantry and sent every student
home with kids.

Scott Ralls
17:36 - 17:48
And, they were able to finish out their rest of their semester at, home in their kitchens, you know, using different forms of technology, but while they couldn't have access to our kitchens.

Scott Ralls
17:50 - 17:59
They were able to finish out And, and many of our other programs were as well, they couldn't
get all the way, but they could get a large part of the way, and probably further than they ever
thought they could.

Scott Ralls
17:59 - 18:08
I think that will be the, the story of the future coming out of this for us is that we talk about it in the context of blended wake tech.

Scott Ralls
18:08 - 18:18
I think every every program now becomes an aspect of blended, you know, we teach everything from blockchain to to baking in physics, to welding.

Scott Ralls
18:18 - 18:24
And sometimes we just think of the seeded classes and lecture halls as the only thing that can be applied to online.

Scott Ralls
18:24 - 18:25
And we know that's not the case.

Scott Ralls
18:25 - 18:32
And so we, we see that this blended form of education is really going to be, we think, our future and the future of much of higher ed.

Scott Ralls
18:32 - 18:33
Moving forward.

Tim Minahan
18:33 - 18:35
Yeah, I see a lot of nodding heads.

Tim Minahan
18:35 - 18:38
I think a blended education is what everyone's thinking about.

Tim Minahan
18:38 - 18:41
Scott, if I may, I'm going to do a follow up question because you mentioned the pantry.

Tim Minahan
18:41 - 18:47
And I think there's a very interesting story there to mentioned earlier the diversity of your, of
your student base.

Tim Minahan
18:47 - 18:49
You know, some being on poverty line.

Tim Minahan
18:50 - 18:56
Being a community college, Wake Tech also really thought about the community and the
students who need tell.

Tim Minahan
18:56 - 19:01
Tell us a little bit about how you kind of opened up your pantry yours, if you will, to help those
vulnerable.

Scott Ralls
19:02 - 19:02
Sure.

Scott Ralls
19:02 - 19:09
Well, one of the things we take great pride in, as a community college is, some institutions
rightly take pride.

Scott Ralls
19:09 - 19:10
And how exclusive they are?

Scott Ralls
19:10 - 19:12
We take just, as much pride, If not more on how inclusive.

Scott Ralls
19:12 - 19:13
We are.

Scott Ralls
19:13 - 19:26
So I like to say we serve the top 100% of students in our region, and that also means we serve a higher percentage of students coming from lower income backgrounds, that's why services like, we call them the nest our pantries on.

Scott Ralls
19:26 - 19:28
Each of our six campuses are emergency aid.

Scott Ralls
19:28 - 19:35
We had to think about those kinds of things because our students, many of them live on the, on the financial edge.

Scott Ralls
19:35 - 19:47
Most of our students are working, students working to come and to, to be at White tech and made them lost their jobs, you know, retail waiters, Uber, drivers and so, are pantries.

Scott Ralls
19:48 - 19:56
We gave out all our food as we were closing out, but what we also did is we invested about half million dollars and food carts that we have set to, all our students.

Scott Ralls
19:56 - 20:00
We've raised about half a million dollars within the community for, for everything from laptops.

Scott Ralls
20:00 - 20:01
To emergency Aid.

Scott Ralls
20:01 - 20:05
And then we also distributed the federal funding, the cares Act funding.

Scott Ralls
20:05 - 20:09
Almost $4 million has been distributed so far in that regard.

Scott Ralls
20:09 - 20:20
So, it was a blend of ways for us to support our students, Because oftentimes we have to bridge them to the next place, many times, something less than $500 can cause them to stop out.

Scott Ralls
20:20 - 20:24
And when they stop out, we find that while they don't plan to, that often means they drop out.

Scott Ralls
20:24 - 20:26
So, we try to prevent those stop outs.

Tim Minahan
20:27 - 20:32
Really, really phenomenal story of weight tech, giving back to its student body there.

Tim Minahan
20:33 - 20:40
Jordan, we mentioned, Scott mentioned kind of this blended education, you know, when I go
around.

Tim Minahan
20:40 - 20:41
And many business leaders.

Tim Minahan
20:41 - 20:51
I've been speaking to their, recognizing that there's added benefits to, in this case, distance
learning about remote work, and, as such, are, are planning to make it a more permanent part of their cost.

Tim Minahan
20:51 - 20:57
And workforce management strategies, and the same holds true in higher education.

Tim Minahan
20:57 - 20:58
So, what lessons learned?

Tim Minahan
20:58 - 21:04
Can you share from the University of Sydney's transition to a Remote Learning model?

Tim Minahan
21:04 - 21:10
And how do you expect that it might change your approach to educating your students in the
future?

Jordan Catling - USyd
21:12 - 21:15
Hm, hm, hm, I'd have to say that.

Jordan Catling - USyd
21:16 - 21:25
Perhaps the biggest lesson that we've learned is that we can do much more than we, we think we can or give ourselves credit for at a much faster pace than we thought possible.

Jordan Catling - USyd
21:27 - 21:43
As, as Scott mentioned, it's really been or inspiring to see how quickly our institution has met,
what looked like, you know, a few months ago that looked like insurmountable challenges and really push past the boundaries of what we previously thought was possible.

Jordan Catling - USyd
21:45 - 21:52
The academics in particular, and researchers have really been the ones that have had to turn on a dime to meet the challenges.

Jordan Catling - USyd
21:53 - 21:56
I thought I'd use American terms just to make things a little bit easier.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:00 - 22:09
I'd probably say that it's really important to take calculated risks and to be willing to shelve ideas that don't produce fruit.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:10 - 22:19
We tried a lot of things, and it's important to try as many things as you can, as quickly as
possible to really dig into ideas.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:19 - 22:26
To try and work out which ones show promise, and I think many people will be surprised by
what they find doing.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:27 - 22:34
That, um, I think working really closely together has been important as well.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:34 - 22:34
I think the best.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:34 - 22:47
One of the best things that we did at the start of all of this was to bring all our people into the
same space to try and work through the challenges to collaborative, collaboratively, solve
problems, including our partners like Citrix.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:48 - 22:57
And I think we're in a much stronger position for having done that, um, in terms of working from home and that sort of thing.

Jordan Catling - USyd
22:59 - 23:20
I think the experience of moving learning online has really shown us that if we can do that for
learning with a set of applications, that can be quite esoteric and specific to academic
institutions, sort of legacy applications that, I think, particularly common in.

Jordan Catling - USyd
23:20 - 23:30
In academia, if we can provide those bits of software for our students, no matter where they are and what device they have.

Jordan Catling - USyd
23:30 - 23:33
There's nothing stopping us from doing that for staff as well.

Jordan Catling - USyd
23:33 - 23:49
And we've been able to expand on the environment that we've built with Citrix in the space of
seven days to serve our 14,000 people that we had overseas, and that were unable to join us at the start of semester.

Jordan Catling - USyd
23:50 - 23:58
If we can do that in the space of seven days, there's nothing stopping us from doing that on a
more permanent scale for our staff.

Jordan Catling - USyd
23:59 - 24:06
So really give them a robust set of tools that they can use to do the work that they need to do.

Tim Minahan
24:07 - 24:08
Yeah, fantastic.

Tim Minahan
24:08 - 24:11
There's that saying Necessity is the mother of invention.

Tim Minahan
24:11 - 24:21
It's great to see you know, this, this current environment has caused us all, the kind of, you know, pick up the pace of innovation, think about things in a different way that we might not have before.

Tim Minahan
24:21 - 24:23
Or we did, but it was years away.

Tim Minahan
24:24 - 24:32
So, switching gears a little bit, Steve, you're looking forward, how is Cambridge preparing for
the next school year?

Tim Minahan
24:32 - 24:40
You're thinking differently about how to enable faculty and staff in this in this new way of
working and this new way of educating.

Steve Hoensch
24:42 - 24:42
Yes.

Steve Hoensch
24:42 - 24:47
Yeah, I'd just like to say what Jordan was saying, that it was exactly something I can relate to.

Steve Hoensch
24:47 - 24:57
Because it's good to hear that they've released this for the student community, where I'm looking at the staff community at the moment, But it's good to hear that if they could do it their way.

Steve Hoensch
24:57 - 25:02
It means that I can deliver an environment that is suitable for even, you know, Stephen.

Steve Hoensch
25:02 - 25:03
So research is going forward.

Steve Hoensch
25:03 - 25:12
So I think one of the biggest challenges that we've had is moving the university, has never
moved very quickly.

Steve Hoensch
25:12 - 25:15
It's a, you know, it's a, it's a body that's been around for many, many years, as you know.

Steve Hoensch
25:16 - 25:20
So changing to this online environment has been very challenging.

Steve Hoensch
25:21 - 25:27
We are looking at online exams for the first time where we've been, you know, classroom based exams for many years.

Steve Hoensch
25:28 - 25:38
So that that's something that we've had to get in place very quickly over the last few months to make sure that people could finish that, know, their courses in time.

Steve Hoensch
25:38 - 25:49
And we had a lot of people who are going to be come adopters that we actually were able to get through their exams and release them to the NHS to help with the pandemic.

Steve Hoensch
25:49 - 25:52
So that was a very good move by the University.

Steve Hoensch
25:52 - 25:56
You know, And it was a way that it's, it's moved to an Agile way of working for the first time.

Steve Hoensch
25:57 - 26:06
And where we're sort of the way Jordan was saying, the way we've been delivering IT over the
last few months has been quite amazing.

Steve Hoensch
26:06 - 26:17
I've never seen the university image so quick, but we've we've delivered some great things along with Citrix, along with Microsoft Teams that we didn't even have at the beginning of this pandemic to keep everyone in.

Steve Hoensch
26:18 - 26:19
Yes, so they can communicate with each other.

Steve Hoensch
26:20 - 26:23
So it's been a really great effort from everybody going forward.

Steve Hoensch
26:23 - 26:29
So, yeah, and I think the way it's changing for us over the next few years is going to be an
interesting thing.

Steve Hoensch
26:30 - 26:35
Obviously, like I said earlier, the students aren't going to be coming back until October.

Steve Hoensch
26:35 - 26:42
But we're still not sure in what capacity that will be because students from all around the globe are going to be affected by this.

Steve Hoensch
26:42 - 26:56
And which, you know, the, the government's talking about these averages between certain
countries which will allow communities to be able to, you know, say America and UK to be able to fly between those using this average.

Steve Hoensch
26:56 - 27:03
But other countries that are still facing this pandemic or, you know, the UK marja end up in a
second locked down.

Steve Hoensch
27:03 - 27:07
So the student community might not be able to come back as quickly as we want.

Steve Hoensch
27:08 - 27:12
And people come to University of Cambridge for the experience as well.

Steve Hoensch
27:12 - 27:14
So how do we keep that experience alive?

Steve Hoensch
27:14 - 27:24
You know, I always joke about the Hogwarts experiments that you see on TV, you know, that
they like the medieval sort of buildings and and that style of classroom teaching and the
environment.

Steve Hoensch
27:24 - 27:28
It gives you, but how can we keep that going.

Steve Hoensch
27:28 - 27:29
If it's an online experience.

Steve Hoensch
27:29 - 27:34
So it's, it's something that we have to carefully look at and how we can keep that alive.

Steve Hoensch
27:34 - 27:36
So yeah, we.

Tim Minahan
27:36 - 27:39
Have to get everyone back for the fall quidditch season, no doubt.

Steve Hoensch
27:39 - 27:39
Yes.

Tim Minahan
27:41 - 27:45
So, Scott, will, we'll wrap up with you.

Tim Minahan
27:45 - 27:59
A similar, similar question, is, you mentioned earlier, wake techs been on the cutting edge of
online learning for, for awhile, you've had training for your faculty, or students who are familiar
with it.

Tim Minahan
27:59 - 28:03
But the recent search and remote learning, really, has put tip the scales there.

Tim Minahan
28:03 - 28:08
So, so, how is the college thinking differently about what the future holds?

Tim Minahan
28:08 - 28:16
And what this might mean for a balance, you know, that blended model you mentioned before of remote education and physical classroom teaching?

Scott Ralls
28:18 - 28:24
Well, I think, fall will be a different semester than the future semesters we're planning for.

Scott Ralls
28:24 - 28:26
What we see is a hybrid online.

Scott Ralls
28:27 - 28:36
We will have some seated classes, but in a socially controlled, every other classroom, with six
feet between students, switch.

Scott Ralls
28:36 - 28:42
And the reason we do that is not because we can't do, we know, we've learned we can do online.

Scott Ralls
28:42 - 28:46
What we've also knows, that for many of our students and some of our courses, they're going to struggle.

Scott Ralls
28:46 - 28:55
We had some with, we had more withdrawals and we want it to past semester So we have to
have some form of seeded for our students as long as we can provide that in a healthy way.

Scott Ralls
28:55 - 28:56
And that's what we'll look to in the fall.

Scott Ralls
28:56 - 29:04
But we'll try to limit our capacity all campuses, but what I think will happen past our fall
semester will be sort of, you know, we use it so much now.

Scott Ralls
29:04 - 29:06
I don't like the term new normal.

Scott Ralls
29:06 - 29:13
But that is really what it will be coming out of fall, and I think, Wait, Tech was heading down
that pathway.

Scott Ralls
29:14 - 29:20
But what the pandemic, you know, if there were any positives coming out of it, will be that it
was an accelerant to where we were heading.

Scott Ralls
29:20 - 29:28
So, you know, I feel like we were kind of 70% along the way through to this blended world.

Scott Ralls
29:28 - 29:35
And I think, all of a sudden, we are going to be, you know, much closer to 100% coming out, the other side.

Scott Ralls
29:35 - 29:38
And I think that's a better world, actually, for education.

Scott Ralls
29:38 - 29:55
And I think, you know, the idea of the Flipped classroom has been talked about for a long time, and we see how supplements And you know how we're interacting right now, how different, how useful that is, how efficient that is and ways that we may not have had, we not been in this situation.

Scott Ralls
29:55 - 29:57
So I do think there'll be some positive coming out of this.

Scott Ralls
29:57 - 30:02
I think it'll be an accelerant to a more blended form of education for us.

Scott Ralls
30:02 - 30:05
And I think that'll be a positive for our students and for the education, we provide.

Tim Minahan
30:07 - 30:07
Yes.

Tim Minahan
30:07 - 30:08
Go to view.

Tim Minahan
30:08 - 30:17
You nail the term of the day, the blended education, you know this is kind of the future online
learning really helped us keep everyone safe and productive during this pandemic.

Tim Minahan
30:17 - 30:24
But as we move forward, it will still play a role in how we educate our students going forward.

Tim Minahan
30:24 - 30:29
Well, we're going to have to wrap it up there as you can see from Sydney to Cambridge and back to wake.

Tim Minahan
30:29 - 30:36
County universities are thinking differently about education and and how to ensure business
continuity moving forward.

Tim Minahan
30:36 - 30:44
I want to thank our panelists Jordan, Scott, and Steve, thanks for sharing your frontline
experiences and invaluable insights.

Tim Minahan
30:44 - 30:50
You're really all shaping the future of education in ways we never thought possible just a few
short months ago.

Tim Minahan
30:51 - 30:55
So next week on Remote Works, a Citrix Virtual series.

Tim Minahan
30:55 - 31:00
None other than the San Francisco 40 niners will be sharing their experience shipping to remote work.

Tim Minahan
31:00 - 31:05
Including how to prepare them for the first ever NFL virtual draft.

Tim Minahan
31:05 - 31:18
Now, for more information on the series, as well as how-to guides, case studies and tools to
empower remote work, visit citrix dot com slash remote works today, all be well, and keep
working!

Steve Hoensch
31:19 - 31:20
Thank you very much.

Scott Ralls
31:21 - 31:21
Thank you.

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