For those who haven’t looked at XenClient recently, today’s XenClient looks very different than the XenClient of yesterday! We recently launched XenClient Enterprise 5 back in August packed with some key features to again push XenClient forward and solve key use cases.

The new XenClient continues to provide:

  • The broadest hardware compatibility list, with over 300 devices and growing
  • A mature, battle tested management server including a rich set of admin tools and policies and support for remote-office management servers

New to XenClient?  Watch the XenClient Enterprise 5 video to see how this core pillar of XenDesktop enables IT to centrally manage and secure corporate laptops and PCs — while providing unprecedented personalization capabilities for end users.

XenClient 5 introduces key features and functionalities such as:

  • Personal vDisk (PvD) technology, enables user installed or departmental apps while admins can continue to update and control the base image.
  • 4th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors (Desktop/Laptops), empowers IT administrators to use the latest and greatest devices from hardware vendors.
  • Windows 8 & 8.1 Guest Support, expands the supported OS footprint of XenClient and allows IT to ‘try’ then ‘buy’ the Windows 8 experience
  • Windows Server 2012 and SQL 2012 Support, enables XenClient’s Synchronizer management tool to run on the latest server operating systems.
  • SCCM Integration Whitepaper, highlights how an existing PC lifecycle management tool can be leveraged with XenClient.
  • Citrix Profile Management Support, enables a ‘Follow-me’ profile across XenClient and XenDesktop.
  • XenDesktop Remote PC Support, offers up a unique ‘FlexCast’ offering by allowing users to remotely access XenClient devices using Citrix Receiver.

The flagship achievement of this release was incorporating PvD into XenClient Enterprise.  This feature is game-changing and expands the use case potential of XenClient further! Prior to incorporating PvD into XenClient Enterprise, we had Shared Image VMs and Custom Image VMs.  Let’s level set on what these image types entail.

Shared Image Mode:

Shared image mode is great because as an administrator, you can manage a single image to X devices.  This means admins can update the image centrally and deploy these updates to X devices from a central console.  At the endpoint however, only the user data is persisted.  If a user installs an application, on reboot, that application goes away.  In this case you will have a happy administrator, but an unhappy user.

Custom Image Mode:

Custom image mode is a bit different because as administrator you still create the image centrally and deliver a single image to X devices. At the endpoint the user data is persisted and if a user installs an application, on reboot, that application persists. The caveat is once you assign and deploy a custom image to the device, the administrator can no longer manage the assigned VM centrally.  To manage an assigned custom image you can use traditional PC lifecycle management tools.  In this case you will have an unhappy administrator, but a happy user.

PvD Image Mode:

PvD image mode is the best of both worlds. An administrator can manage a single image to X devices.  At the endpoint the user data is persisted and if a user installs an application, on reboot, that application persists. This means the admin can update the image centrally and deploy these updates to X devices from a central console all while allowing application customization at the endpoint. In this case you will have a happy administrator and a happy user.

 To summarize:

 PvD Image mode enables plenty of great use cases and I will explore these in future blogs.

Now that you have heard about XenClient Enterprise 5, contact a XenClient expert if you have any questions or want to learn more.

Join the conversation by connecting with the Citrix XenClient team online!