As I noted in my first blog post about optimizing Flash performance on XenApp, SpeedScreen Flash Acceleration currently checks for specific binary file names such as flash8b.ocx or flash9.ocx. Therefore, new versions of Flash require the creation of hotfixes to accommodate different binary file names. After reviewing this issue, I challenged our Engineering team to come up with an improved design. They devised a creative new solution that they predict will gracefully handle Flash updates and thus eliminate the time lag between new releases of Flash and the development of new XenApp hotfixes. That enhancement is now working its way through development and test.

In the meantime, we still need hotfixes that will look for newer Flash file names. I previously highlighted that a limited release hotfix (PSE400R03W2K3091) is available for customers with active Preferred Support Services contracts who are running XenApp Presentation Server 4.0 on Windows Server 2003 (see KB article CTX115426, login with appropriate access privileges required). Subsequently, our Support department received requests for a solution for XenApp Presentation Server 4.0 on Windows Server 2000. In response, the Life Cycle Maintenance (LCM) team has created and released hotfix PSE400R04W2K012 for PS 4.0 with HRP04 on Windows Server 2000. This limited release hotfix adds support for Adobe Flash versions 7a, 8, 8b, 9, 9c and 9d. Customers with an approved support contract can obtain the Knowledge Base article describing this new hotfix by visiting our Support web site at http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX115555 (login required) or by searching for CTX115555.

Meanwhile, Adobe has released Flash 9e (9.0.115.0). I wish I could tell you that the new hotfix handles 9e but, as Aaron Parker has already identified in his blog post on stealthpuppy.com, it doesn’t. However, the wheels are in motion to create a hotfix that will handle 9e. If all goes well, this might be the one that introduces Engineering’s new generic solution that isn’t tied to specific binary file names. Stay tuned to this blog for further updates.

Derek Thorslund
Product Strategist, Multimedia Virtualization